2205 – Lancaster

The Lancaster class, although not as attractive as the contemporary Asia class was beloved by its crews as it had the reputation of being a ship that got you home no matter what damage it suffered. The class served as the basis for both the Siegfried class dreadnought and Belleau Wood class assault ship.

The USS Lancaster is generally considered to be one of the first “modern” starship with all primary facilities in the same general positions as in current vessels, for example the bridge was placed in the top of the primary hull. Although this position has been criticized as reckless and unnecessary, it symbolizes the bridge’s command of the entire ship. Despite being compared to a “warp-capable brick” because of its stark, almost brutal, contours and thick, relatively short warp nacelles the Lancaster class inspired a loyalty amongst its crews that few other Starship classes could match.

USS Lancaster commissioned in February 2205, and the next 15 vessels followed in the subsequent 24 months. The new class was hailed as a significant advance in starship engineering. However, perhaps the best measure of a ship’s success is the opinions of their crews, and the Lancaster class ships were loved by their crews. This fierce loyalty was reflected by the perversely prideful nicknames, such as “Thunderhog” (USS Olympia) and “Death Slab” (USS Texas), that they gave their ships. These ships were often decorated with unofficial hull “nose art” and kill markings. In fact, many crews were reluctant to give their ships up when newer classes entered service.

One reason for their popularity was that they were the most powerful warships of their time, with the highest speeds, strongest shields, and greatest firepower. Because of their reputations as superb fighting ships, the class tended to attract many Starfleet’s finest personnel. Lancaster class captains were probably the most aggressive in the history of Starfleet, however, this leadership style perfectly suited the spirit of the times and Starfleet fulfilled its popular mandate to protect Federation citizens from danger. As such ,the Lancaster ships were constantly in action throughout their careers. The class was refitted with modern weapons and shields in 2248, and saw much action in the four years war.

After an illustrious career, the Lancaster class was withdrawn in 2264. The last to retire, USS Unicorn, the recipient of 7 battle stars is now on display at the Starfleet Museum.

 

Class: X Year: 2205
Ship Source: The Starfleet Museum Ship Datasheet: Download PDF

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Commissioned Ships

USS Lancaster NCC-1209
USS Merkwürdigliebe NCC-1210
USS Ticonderoga NCC-1211
USS Poole NCC-1212
USS Colossus NCC-1213
USS Invincible NCC-1214
USS Ceres NCC-1215
USS Olympia NCC-1216
USS Wolfe NCC-1217
USS The Tracys NCC-1218
USS Mustang NCC-1219
USS Pearson NCC-1220
USS Haldeman NCC-1221
USS Giraud NCC-1222
USS Valiant NCC-1223
USS Capek NCC-1224
USS Antietam NCC-1225
USS Eisenhower NCC-1226
USS Whittle NCC-1227
USS Alexander Nevsky NCC-1228
USS Thunderbolt NCC-1229
USS Ursus NCC-1230
USS Aristarchus NCC-1231
USS Hector NCC-1232
USS Franz Joseph NCC-1233
USS Unicorn NCC-1234
USS Chaffee NCC-1235
USS Lindbergh NCC-1236
USS Kosciuszko NCC-1237
USS Jakarta NCC-1238
USS Koryu NCC-1239
USS Venkman NCC-1240
USS London NCC-1241
USS Burroughs NCC-1242
USS Illustrious NCC-1243
USS Oppenheimer NCC-1244
USS Phoenix NCC-1245
USS Chandrasekhar NCC-1246
USS Neptune NCC-1247
USS Przhevalsky NCC-1248
USS Singapore NCC-1249
USS Arronax NCC-1250
USS Alfred T Mahan NCC-1251
USS Texas NCC-1252
USS Churchill NCC-1253
USS Spitfire NCC-1254
USS Amundsen NCC-1255
USS Phantom NCC-1256
USS India NCC-1257
USS Spaulding NCC-1258

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