2251 – Stellarford II (Assault)

“The Stellarford II (Mk4) was an attempt to restart production using new technologies in the shape of the FWH-1 warp drive. However only five new build ships were completed before the shipyard went bust due to the high costs of building the class compared to newer modular vessels, a further hull was abandoned while 60% complete. These five ships were procured by Mars shipping as part of the civilian reserve fleet program, which saw Star Fleet underwrite a proportion of the cost of acquisition of the ships in return for them being made available in times of emergency.

The performance of the Mk4 prompted Star Fleet to offer to underwrite the conversion of Mk3 ships to the standard, again in return for use of the ships in times of war. At the time the conversion of a such a number of large elderly ships was thought to be pointless, but with hindsight it can be seen that it was a perfectly timed program. 20 ships were modified to this mark by 2247, and that was planned to be the end of the program.

Visually, the Mk4 could be easily distinguished from the earlier versions as the short FFTL-3B nacelles were replaced with the much longer dilithium energised FWH-1 nacelles. The more modern construction and materials of the nacelles meant that despite their increased size they massed substantially less, meaning the class reverted to Class IV mass (unladen) and Class VI (Laden).

The increasing hositilities with the Klingon Empire prompted Star Fleet to reassess its needs for assault ships, and in 2251 an incomplete new build Mk4 Stellarford Class liner was taken in hand by Star Fleet Division and completed to Mk5 standards. The Mk5 added fore and aft accelerator cannons in the former bow and stern observation decks, as well as two pairs of lasers covering all arcs fore and aft at the top of the ‘sail’ assembly. These weapons were intended for use in self defence only, as part of the new role of assault ship. Later that year the six newest remaining Mk3s were converted to this standard, as well as four of the new build Mk4s and a pair of rebuilt Mk4s. In total 13 ships commissioned as Mk5s.

Class: IV-V Year: 2251
Ship Source: Spaceflight Chronology Ship Datasheet: Download PDF

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2245 – Stellarford II

“The Stellarford II (Mk4) was an attempt to restart production using new technologies in the shape of the FWH-1 warp drive. However only five new build ships were completed before the shipyard went bust due to the high costs of building the class compared to newer modular vessels, a further hull was abandoned while 60% complete. These five ships were procured by Mars shipping as part of the civilian reserve fleet program, which saw Star Fleet underwrite a proportion of the cost of acquisition of the ships in return for them being made available in times of emergency.

The performance of the Mk4 prompted Star Fleet to offer to underwrite the conversion of Mk3 ships to the standard, again in return for use of the ships in times of war. At the time the conversion of a such a number of large elderly ships was thought to be pointless, but with hindsight it can be seen that it was a perfectly timed program. 20 ships were modified to this mark by 2247, and that was planned to be the end of the program.

Visually, the Mk4 could be easily distinguished from the earlier versions as the short FFTL-3B nacelles were replaced with the much longer dilithium energised FWH-1 nacelles. The more modern construction and materials of the nacelles meant that despite their increased size they massed substantially less, meaning the class reverted to Class IV mass (unladen) and Class VI (Laden).”

Class: IV-V Year: 2245
Ship Source: Spaceflight Chronology Ship Datasheet: Download PDF

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2196 – Stellarford I

“The Stellarford Class Starliner had double the capacity of the previous Declaration Class liners, and its much greater range opened up the galaxy to all peoples. Catering especially to the burgeoning tourist industry, these Stellarford series ships made excursions to such galactic wonders as the Jewel Stars. One Mk1, the King Charles, was the most luxurious starliner ever conceived and set a standard of opulence and comfort still unsurpassed.”

Class: IV-V Year: 2196
Ship Source: Spaceflight Chronology Ship Datasheet: Download PDF

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2242 – Sawyer

The Sawyer class Scout entered service in 2242. Designed as a fast scout for use in non combat areas, a total of 69 were built.

On paper, the Sawyer was an excellent vessel, being both efficient and fast.  The class was however always mistrusted by crews as it had earned an unenviable reputation as a result of a number of ships being lost. The USS Gulliver, destroyed at Axanar earned the class another unwanted footnote in history as being the first ship to be destroyed in the Four Years War in 2252.

The growing area of hostilities meant that few areas could really be deemed as being ‘non combat’ and during 2253 losses of the Sawyer Class mounted to an alarming extent. The situation came to a head in November 2253 when three of the surviving 40 ships of the class were lost with all hands. Starfleet Command immediately ordered that the ships be withdrawn from active service.

The reason for the failure of the class is hard to pinpoint, for their time they were not too badly armed or shielded, and they had a fair turn of speed and good manoeuvrability. In all 36 ships survived to be withdrawn from service, but they were soon pressed back into service as Trainers for Starfleet Academy . It was while serving in this role that a potential cause of the losses was found. It was discovered that the warp nacelle assembly, although rated for landing operations was in fact susceptible to stress damage, examination of the service history of the lost vessels showed that many were among the fleet leaders for number of landings.

As a result of this discovery all Sawyer class ships were withdrawn from any use in 2261, and were subsequently sold for scrap.

The lessons learned from the Sawyer debacle were implemented on all subsequent designs that had landing capability, and were retrofitted to existing designs. Chief among these improvements was an early type of structural reinforcement field that was used during take off and landing, as well during atmospheric operations to reduce stress on the hull and warp nacelle assembly.

Class: III Year: 2242
Ship Source: Space Flight Chronology Ship Datasheet: Download PDF

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2253 – Bode Refit

The Bode Class entered Starfleet service in 2236. This large (for its time) scout was one of the last major warship classes built without the benefit of dilithium moderated warp drives.  The Bode class was designed to act as a Battlefleet Scout, and quite often was deployed in task forces alongside a Baton Rouge Class Cruiser. The Baton Rouge Class ship being the flagship of the force, and the Bode it’s eyes and ears.  

The Mk1 Bode class featured protected warp nacelle bussards, on an engine that in terms of design owed much to the design used on the Mann class cruiser. Initially the protective ring only enclosed half of the bussard, but later this ring was extended around the whole circumference of the bussard scoop to try to boost efficiency.   The Bode was popular with its crews, as although only lightly armed with lasers, it did include a single FAC2 accelerator cannon, which meant that the Bode could easily damage then evade a more powerful opponent. The ample power of the engines and excellent maneuverability of the design allowed the Bode to choose its combats.

The Class was later supplanted in its fleet role by Hermes, Monoceros and Nelson class scouts, but it was retained in use supporting second line fleets. With the outbreak of the Four Years War, many Bode class vessels were pressed into service scouting ahead of convoys.   The failure of the diminutive Hale class in service, and its withdrawal from operational use in early 2253, meant that the Bode assumed greater importance. The other common scout class, the Sawyer, was deemed to be too small for the role, and production of Hermes and Nelson class vessels was being deferred in favour of Destroyers of the Larson and Saladin classes instead.  

Accordingly 20 Bodes were quickly re-equipped with Dilithium moderated warp drive, which gave a maximum speed of warp 8, however this was at the expense of a 20% loss of installed power. To compensate for this loss of available power, the shields were upgraded to the FSD binary system, which more than made up for the loss. As part of the upgrade the L14 computer replaced the old L3, but uniquely the class retained the old FNSP-5B impulse drive as it was felt that the operational profile of the class did not suffer from the lower maximum speed (0.25c) of the engine compared to the newer generation of impulse drives (0.5c).  Following the withdrawal of the Sawyer Class scout from service in late 2253 the Bode was for a short time the main fleet scout. When sufficient numbers of Nelson and Hermes class scouts became available in 2254 the Bode was withdrawn from operational service, as although it was a capable vessel problems with maintenance meant that the class was very man power intensive to maintain in service.  

Additionally, as with the experience with the Sawyer and Hale classes, Starfleet was uncomfortable with the level of losses that these light scouts were suffering given the crew shortages that Starfleet was suffering as a result of the war.  Most surviving Bodes were mothballed at the Morena Yards, and would have been recalled to service if the strategic  situation had deteriorated further, but in the event this was not required. Four Bode class ships remained in limited service attached to the Academy.  A proposal to refit the Bodes with Phasers, Photon Torpedoes and new impulse drives was made after the end of the war to allow a return to service, but it was felt that refitting newer classes was far more cost effective.  The Bodes attached to the Academy survived in service until 2262.  Most of the Bodes that had been stored at Morena were later expended in trials of the new FP4 torpedo system

  • Class:V
  • Year:2253
  • Ship Source:Space Flight Chronology
  • Ship Datasheet:Download PDF

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2236 – Bode

The Bode Class entered Starfleet service in 2236. This large (for its time) scout was one of the last major warship classes built without the benefit of dilithium moderated warp drives.  The Bode class was designed to act as a Battlefleet Scout, and quite often was deployed in task forces alongside a Baton Rouge Class Cruiser. The Baton Rouge Class ship being the flagship of the force, and the Bode it’s eyes and ears.  

The Mk1 Bode class featured protected warp nacelle bussards, on an engine that in terms of design owed much to the design used on the Mann class cruiser. Initially the protective ring only enclosed half of the bussard, but later this ring was extended around the whole circumference of the bussard scoop to try to boost efficiency.   The Bode was popular with its crews, as although only lightly armed with lasers, it did include a single FAC2 accelerator cannon, which meant that the Bode could easily damage then evade a more powerful opponent. The ample power of the engines and excellent maneuverability of the design allowed the Bode to choose its combats.

The Class was later supplanted in its fleet role by Hermes, Monoceros and Nelson class scouts, but it was retained in use supporting second line fleets. With the outbreak of the Four Years War, many Bode class vessels were pressed into service scouting ahead of convoys.   The failure of the diminutive Hale class in service, and its withdrawal from operational use in early 2253, meant that the Bode assumed greater importance. The other common scout class, the Sawyer, was deemed to be too small for the role, and production of Hermes and Nelson class vessels was being deferred in favour of Destroyers of the Larson and Saladin classes instead.  

Accordingly 20 Bodes were quickly re-equipped with Dilithium moderated warp drive, which gave a maximum speed of warp 8, however this was at the expense of a 20% loss of installed power. To compensate for this loss of available power, the shields were upgraded to the FSD binary system, which more than made up for the loss. As part of the upgrade the L14 computer replaced the old L3, but uniquely the class retained the old FNSP-5B impulse drive as it was felt that the operational profile of the class did not suffer from the lower maximum speed (0.25c) of the engine compared to the newer generation of impulse drives (0.5c).  Following the withdrawal of the Sawyer Class scout from service in late 2253 the Bode was for a short time the main fleet scout. When sufficient numbers of Nelson and Hermes class scouts became available in 2254 the Bode was withdrawn from operational service, as although it was a capable vessel problems with maintenance meant that the class was very man power intensive to maintain in service.  

Additionally, as with the experience with the Sawyer and Hale classes, Starfleet was uncomfortable with the level of losses that these light scouts were suffering given the crew shortages that Starfleet was suffering as a result of the war.  Most surviving Bodes were mothballed at the Morena Yards, and would have been recalled to service if the strategic  situation had deteriorated further, but in the event this was not required. Four Bode class ships remained in limited service attached to the Academy.  A proposal to refit the Bodes with Phasers, Photon Torpedoes and new impulse drives was made after the end of the war to allow a return to service, but it was felt that refitting newer classes was far more cost effective.  The Bodes attached to the Academy survived in service until 2262.  Most of the Bodes that had been stored at Morena were later expended in trials of the new FP4 torpedo system

  • Class:V
  • Year:2236
  • Ship Source:Space Flight Chronology
  • Ship Datasheet:Download PDF

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2233 – Hale

The Hale was first commissioned in Mark 1 form in 2233, and was intended to act as a light scout for Galaxy Exploration Command, a heavier Mark 2 version followed two years later to suit the needs of Military Operations
Command. The design was intended to produce a compact ship with minimal surface area to reduce observability. GEC planned to use the vessels for covert surveillance of worlds subject to the prime directive which had not yet made contact with the outside universe. MOC also planned to use the vessels for covert surveillance, but of less benign targets.

The result of the low observability requirement was to produce an unconventional ship with nacelles mounted close to the side of ship, the nacelles were also shielded against sensors with hull plating. This gave the class an appearance of being armoured, but this was far from the case. The design was studied with great interest by many designers as it was hoped that the close in engine mounting would give major benefits.

In service the ships proved reliable, and were quite well liked by their crews, despite the cramped accommodation they offered to the 65 crew they carried. The crews also appreciated the distinctiveness of the design, which made them stand out from the more conventional designs used in Starfleet.

In 2242, the Hale Class USS Pace, while engaged in surveillance operations near the Triangle obtained sensor readings on a new Klingon Design, this is now known to BE the first time a UFP ship scanned a D7A class cruiser. The USS Pace managed to scan the D7A for 15 minutes without being detected, before warping back to its base.

The Commissioning of newer scouts such as the Bode, Sawyer and Nelson classes gradually reduced the importance of the Hale to MOC, and by 2249 all remaining ships had been transferred to GEC or assigned to the Academy as Trainers. The Hale Class continued in active service until 2253 when it was decided that given the tactical situation of the Four Years War, continued operation of such a small lightly protected scout was reckless even in ‘safe’ areas. The ships assigned to the Academy survived in service until 2256.

Production of the Hale totalled 60 Mk 1s, and 70 Mk 2s between 2233 and 2239, no ships were modified between marks. The Class was produced at Morena Shipyards. Remarkably the class was never refitted. A refit program was considered in 2246, but a gradual change in emphasis towards larger scouts (such as the Nelson and Hermes classes) meant that it was rejected as uneconomical and unnecessary, as such the ships retained their non-dilithium engines until they left service.

Class: II Year: 2233
Ship Source: Space Flight Chronology Ship Datasheet: Download PDF

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